Posts Tagged: scalderphotography

Conowingo Eagles

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Adult Bald Eaglewith fish in talons, liftininf off from water, looking down at fish (SandraCalderbank, sandra calderbank)Adult Bald Eagle lifting off from water with fish (SandraCalderbank, sandra calderbank)Adult Bald Eagle with feet forward, about to catch a fish in water. Fish is visible in water (SandraCalderbank, sandra calderbank)Adult Bald Eagle dropping a fish mid air into the water (SandraCalderbank, sandra calderbank)

Watching Bald Eagles is such a wonderful treat! Unless you live on the coast of Alaska, Bald Eagles are quite uncommon (at least in the mountains of North Carolina they are quite rare).  Last year a friendly fellow photographer shared the secret of  the Conowingo Eagles.  I want to thank you Bruce DeBonnis The Intrepid Amateur for sharing this wonderful place to watch and photograph Bald Eagles!  Conowingo is on the Susquehanna River and in November and December the Eagles are very active. It was my first time using my new Canon 5Dsr for flight shots and it greatly exceeded my expectations. I would love to hear what other bird photographers think of the 5Dsr.  I am very happy with the performance of this 50 MP camera.

The Seldom Seen

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Juvenile Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron perched on dead limb in evening light (SandraCalderbank, sandra calderbank)

I was intently focused on photographing Belted Kingfishers in flight as they darted by my camera one evening at Bombay Hook Wildlife Refuge. The sun was quickly setting and I turned around and this “jewel” sat on a dead limb directly behind me! I thought it was a Juvenile Black-Crowned Night-Heron because I had seen several flying around earlier but something was very different. It was the seldom seen Juvenile Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron.

Great Kiskadee

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Great Kiskadee head image with red berry in beak (sandra calderbank)

 

If you live in the most southern tip of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, the Great Kiskadee is  apparently a common sight and sound. It’s voice is a loud kis-ka-dee-dee-dee….and on a recent visit to south Texas, I heard this vibrant yellow flycatcher long before I ever had the opportunity to photograph one.