Posts Tagged: sandra calderbank

Ferruginous Hawk

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Ferruginous Hawk in flight

Ferruginous Hawk, Light Morph

I captured this Ferruginous Hawk in flight over an open field in New Mexico. I did not recognize what kind of hawk I was watching until another bird photographer at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge asked if I had seen that Ferruginous Hawk. Identification of this handsome, unusual Hawk without the guidance of a fellow bird photographer would have been impossible. Ferruginous means “rust colored” and this Ferruginous Hawk is a light-morph with a very pale body.

Male Northern Cardinal posing

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Male Northern Cardinal posing

Male Northern Cardinal posing

This beautiful Male Northern Cardinal posed on this flowery branch with red berries. He is so attractive as he touched down on this branch. I’m uncertain if the red berries appealed to him or the gigantic ants that have likewise discovered the berries! I am grateful he granted me a photograph in this specific spot, regardless of the purpose of his interest.

Adult and Juvenile Crested Caracara

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adult and juvenile Crested caracara

Adult and Juvenile Crested Caracara

These two Crested Caracara touched down on the same branch on an extremely cloudy day in South Texas. This Adult and Juvenile Crested Caracara look like they are enjoying a discussion about something surely significant, like where is the closest food? The Crested Caracara is a huge bird of prey and they frequently follow vultures to feed on carrion but they also catch live small animals and birds. Crested Caracara are not common in the United States, found only in South Texas and a small area of Florida, so it made me smile to discover these two perched on the same limb.

Northern Mockingbird with yellow Berry

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Northern Mockingbird with yellow berry

The Northern Mockingbird is widespread in most of the United States. They are extremely territorial and make themselves clearly visible and freely heard. The Mockingbird mimics other birds and learn new songs throughout their entire life. I discovered this Northern Mockingbird picking a yellow berry, practically dropping it.

Orange-crowned Warbler in puddle

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Orange-crowned warbler in puddle

This lovely little warbler landed in a puddle in front of me in south Texas. It exhausted my recognition techniques but I eventually by a process of elimination, decided on an Orange-crowned Warbler. I may be inaccurate and would welcome any input. Apparently the Orange-crowned Warbler has a minuscule patch of orange feathers on the crown which it rarely shows unless it raises its head feathers in agitation. This bird did not raise its head feathers, so I did not notice an orange crown on this bird, which would have made the identification much easier. It landed in the puddle, flapped and flew away.